EnglishCentral      Weekly Magazine         Read The Latest Newsletter       New Resources        Member TESOL Certificate           Gif Lingua Books

65,000+ Members! Join Us!

TEACH WITH ENGLISHCENTRAL

What We Offer

Video Lessons Player

                             Study Music

Photos

  • Add Photos
  • View All

Our Weekly Magazine

New Content

Project Peace

 

Resources And Discussion

Learning Communities

Started by Allan Richards in Teaching and Methodology Oct 27. 0 Replies

Hey everyone!I am new to the forum and am curious how you feel learning communities benefit educators when it comes to developing a collective responsibility as educators. Do you feel a forum like…Continue

Implementation

Started by Christina Shepherd in Teaching and Methodology. Last reply by ddeubel Oct 26. 1 Reply

How does implementation help you out throughout the year? I am curious to know what things have worked for you and what things have not worked for you through an implementation standard.  Continue

ABCs - Alphabet Resources or Ideas?

Started by NEWS NOW in Teaching and Methodology. Last reply by ddeubel Sep 19. 74 Replies

I guess the alphabet is our bread…Continue

Tags: children, abc, kids, phonics, reading

Top 5 Game

Started by susie silver in Teaching and Methodology. Last reply by ddeubel Sep 17. 14 Replies

Hi David Maybe its obvious to some but I'm not sure how to play and I also want to create a top 5 game as well. What is the point of it. There are always 5 answers. Do the students guess according to…Continue

Tags: 5, top

Badge

Loading…

About

Hi, I'm looking for some advice on discipline in the classroom. I teach Grade 2 Public Middle Schoolers and the vast majority of my classes are fine in terms of behaviour. Unfortunately I'm getting problems with 1 or 2.

It tends to be from boys in one or two classes and they are usually lower level students. Fighting, banging things, doing drills out of sync and the usual kind of stuff. I'm not really a disciplinarian and think that because I started at the school with that image these kids are taking advantage.

I have wondered if maybe my lessons need to be easier and maybe I need to look at that, however I feel the majority of the students are doing fine. I have been disappointed my co teacher in these classes (who speaks little English) hasn't really been able to help. (She gave Candy out at the START of class and when I moved two students she let them move back if they "promised" to work hard - they broke the "promise!!!".) There are 50 students in my classes so it's difficult to control a misbehaving, tired class) Today I stopped games and candy but don't think it's fair to punish the hardworking students because of others.

Views: 814

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

William,

I'm glad you said what you did so strongly. I have the opportunity of meeting many foreign teachers who work in Korea (through workshops and training) and this is one topic I address head on. There is no excuse and in so many ways, we native speaking teachers are not only teachers but agents of change (and so to the other way around). When it comes to corporal punishment we should insist it doesn't happen in our classrooms, co-teacher or not. This should be part of any discussion (in a polite manner) when we first begin teaching.

I get sick of so often hearing of foreign teachers almost gloating that they slapped, pinched, nudged even kicked students. That along with push ups and holding their hands above their head etc.....I always speak out and maybe it will change their mind, as your words help do.

I think that so much of what education is about is unfortunately "power". I'm really against that and I don't think any teacher, no matter the situation, can deny that we don't only teach a subject but that we teach a child/student. We teach them how to be -- in many cases we spend more time with them than they do with their own parents. It is encumbent upon us to point them in the right direction regarding how to be "human".

I'm going to start a conversation about co-teaching, my own research area and focus and I hope you'll join in...

David
I sent the link for this site to my korean co-teachers. I think they don't want to hit but that's the standard at our school. Thanks to another post I will definitely take the time to sit down and negotiate a class contract with my students next time round. I 'm not consistant but I've had some success with a couple of other things. I always make sure to stay in touch with my co-teachers. Every friday I always email the lesson for the following week. That way they are ready to participate when required. Also, it's important for the co-teacher to have a presence in the class room. If they are not involved, it has a huge impact on classroom behaviour. One other thing I have tried is to bring a sense of team work to the classroom. It started when I told y korean co-teacher to tell the students that some are good at math, others at history, art, writing, etc. In English class individual students know a few different words, but together they know a lot. So I always tell them they are a team. If one student doesn't know the answer, they can help him or her. That cuts down on taunting and name calling but DOESN'T elminiate it. It also increases student talk and decreases teacher talk.
Just a few suggestions - I have had the same problem(s) and now I start a new class by saying that any student who misbehaves more than once has to stand up and sing a song - in English ......or leave the class.
I then told the Chinese teacher that she must not under any circumstances be nice to the boys in the class who are naughty or I will leave her to it. If they still misbehave I then placed the real recalcitrant boys between the girls- they hated that and shut up very quickly.
I've been told that the naughty students (usually boys) have no respect for foreign teachers as they dont see them as any threat - we generally dont speak any Chinese - which in their eyes means that you have no power - you cant for instance speak to their parents if they are bad. Threaten to do this with a teacher teacher.
Next - tell the good students that every time one of the boys starts to act up -they have to say " zip it" along with you -with suitable hand motions across the mouth.
Be a little tougher at the beginning - you are not there to be liked - but to teach. Being liked is a bonus and will happen.
Hi David,

Sorry for the long silence. It took me a while to recover from the kidney stones and the shocking disappointments of the so-called teacher training program in Gapyeong. Have been busy with a couple of projects since - developing the foundations of a new private international school and now for another specialized one for the health-care industry. (How's that for irony!) It's giving me the opportunity to finish the four course books I've been writing for years for my own curriculum which I'll have the chance to implement and monitor for the few years if all goes well... hope to get some good research papers out of it... especially as we're going to deliver Phonemic Awareness and Phonics training to the young adults who will be taking the courses - an area where there is a dearth of research. Any leads/information in this regard would be welcomed.

While I was in Jeju (obviously the best place to be in Korea, in retrospect) my best friend, who was the head of English at our high school, and I developed the co-teaching program that went on to be presented to and adopted by the Ministry for the Epic program (in typical blindly transmogrified form). Of course they did not address the 'human/psychometrics' aspects which are critical to success in such a program. But isn't that the case in general EFL situations? Hyun, Sung-hwan, my friend and co-teacher, wrote his master's thesis on the topic while we were together. You might contact him through the school: Namju High School, Sogwipo, Jeju. or by email: hyun648@yahoo.co.kr.

Since I haven't been here for a while, and more relevant to this thread, maybe you would direct me to the right buttons to upload the "Managing Motivation" teacher training resource book I put together. (Would adding it here be best?) I think it would help those who are seriously interested in this critically important topic. The introduction warns that one should remember we are not managing classrooms - we're trying to create environments for effective learning and managing human spirits... take it from there.

Hope all is well. Best regards,

William

ddeubel said:
William,

I'm glad you said what you did so strongly. I have the opportunity of meeting many foreign teachers who work in Korea (through workshops and training) and this is one topic I address head on. There is no excuse and in so many ways, we native speaking teachers are not only teachers but agents of change (and so to the other way around). When it comes to corporal punishment we should insist it doesn't happen in our classrooms, co-teacher or not. This should be part of any discussion (in a polite manner) when we first begin teaching.

I get sick of so often hearing of foreign teachers almost gloating that they slapped, pinched, nudged even kicked students. That along with push ups and holding their hands above their head etc.....I always speak out and maybe it will change their mind, as your words help do.

I think that so much of what education is about is unfortunately "power". I'm really against that and I don't think any teacher, no matter the situation, can deny that we don't only teach a subject but that we teach a child/student. We teach them how to be -- in many cases we spend more time with them than they do with their own parents. It is encumbent upon us to point them in the right direction regarding how to be "human".

I'm going to start a conversation about co-teaching, my own research area and focus and I hope you'll join in...

David
William,

Good to hear from you! Yeah, I can imagine how challenging the last year has been for you but seems like you've hit your stride again......

I sympathize with the coteaching problems and the problem of initiating anything within a large organization. Unless YOU have the control of the implementation, you can expect half measures and watered down stuff, me thinks....

Please load up the Classroom management document here! I've highlighted this discussion and it will remain featured so new members can go through it and get some great ideas. I'll be featuring more discussions soon, once I get some time. A nice feature we have, so the most valuable discussions remain visible in the forum and not buried deep...

You might also upload it into our Resource / Share forum. A permanent place for documents. Maybe under Prof. Development???

More later, again good to hear some news,

David
Managing Motivation - resource book is here!

ddeubel said:
William,

I'm glad you said what you did so strongly. I have the opportunity of meeting many foreign teachers who work in Korea (through workshops and training) and this is one topic I address head on. There is no excuse and in so many ways, we native speaking teachers are not only teachers but agents of change (and so to the other way around). When it comes to corporal punishment we should insist it doesn't happen in our classrooms, co-teacher or not. This should be part of any discussion (in a polite manner) when we first begin teaching.

I get sick of so often hearing of foreign teachers almost gloating that they slapped, pinched, nudged even kicked students. That along with push ups and holding their hands above their head etc.....I always speak out and maybe it will change their mind, as your words help do.

I think that so much of what education is about is unfortunately "power". I'm really against that and I don't think any teacher, no matter the situation, can deny that we don't only teach a subject but that we teach a child/student. We teach them how to be -- in many cases we spend more time with them than they do with their own parents. It is encumbent upon us to point them in the right direction regarding how to be "human".

I'm going to start a conversation about co-teaching, my own research area and focus and I hope you'll join in...

David
Attachments:
Dear William,

I have just begun to read "Mangaing Motivation", but it looks like a wonderful resource! Thank you so much for sharing your hard work so generously. I APPRECIATE it!!

Best wishes,
Ellen
"Together We're Better"
You're welcome. Please let me know if/how you use the resource.
William
Ellen Pham said:
Dear William,

I have just begun to read "Mangaing Motivation", but it looks like a wonderful resource! Thank you so much for sharing your hard work so generously. I APPRECIATE it!!

Best wishes,
Ellen
I'm writing this for the teachers who work in Korean public schools. If you are working for a Korean public school you are hired as an "Assistant". You should either be co-teaching all the time or you should be taking half the class and have your Korean co-teacher taking the other half. I;m writing this becouse in the past some KET's have been in a nasty habbit of throwing inexperienced NET's in the room with forty odd students .
Move the 1 or 2 disruptive students to the back of the room at the first hint of misbehavior and show them the card from Nelson Beard that says they are being rude or impolite in English and Korean. Try not to give candy as a reward because it only leads to an expensive addiction. Have a nice, cooperative chat with the Korean teacher. Tell him/her that you expect all of the students to behave appropriately. If he/she does not help, go to the Vice Principal. Call 1330 and an English operator will translate for you. You are there to teach English and they are spending a huge amount of money to have you there. If you are unable to do that job, then something must be done. You have a right and duty to teach and the students have the right to learn, and most of them do really want to learn. The co-teacher should take care of things, but many don't or won't. Don't be mean or nasty to anybody, just stick to the facts. Don't lower yourself. If you allow those 1 or 2 students to run things, nobody will learn anything. Unfortunately, that's the case in far too many classrooms. You can also enroll in some teaching classes in the Seoul area. There are many available and it's a good investment. Please do not resort to any kinds of physical or verbal abuse, however. You might even have a mini-conference with the disruptive students and even invite their parents. You can always use 1330 operators to translate if necessary. Generally, somebody in the school or an administrative office (such as a supervisor of English education) should be available to help you out. Most of them are eager and willing to be of help, but they are often simply not aware of the problems. Make them aware! I hope that you aren't allowing the students to call you by your first name or playing around with them! You are there to be their teacher - not their best friend or whatever other role they try to get you to assume. Network with some experienced, successful teachers. Middle school is tough territory - especially with huge classes. Good luck! Have high (but reasonable) expectations and don't settle for anything else.
Thanks Ellen,
Hope it helps and hope others in this thread will read it or at least some of the articles relevant to their concerns.. though it's difficult to deal with any kind of motivation challenge without a good grasp of all the fundamentals.. as there are so many factors that can be triggers for behavioural challenges.
The resources David has put up are good follow ups, though the tones are a bit too prescriptive for my taste unless viewed through a traditional teacher's eyes.... those who are more comfortable with a technical/managerial approach. (Teachers tend to like ordering tangible things and try to do so even when the elements are fluid! One of the reasons I prefer the nomenclature of Facilitator to that of Teacher.)

Anyway... step by step, little by little, page by page, we grow and learn so they (the kids) can grow and learn faster than we did!

Happy classes, William

William M Tweedie said:
"Together We're Better"
You're welcome. Please let me know if/how you use the resource.
William
Ellen Pham said:
Dear William,

I have just begun to read "Mangaing Motivation", but it looks like a wonderful resource! Thank you so much for sharing your hard work so generously. I APPRECIATE it!!

Best wishes,
Ellen
I thought I'd add this here... this book is really good "Classroom Dynamics". Lots of great tips.

I'd also recommend using music in the background. It really can work! See on our main page on the right side, a player with Study Music. Use it in class and the composer SATIE really helps calm students. It also can be used when test taking, writing. It also works when students are too loud and doing group work. Just put it on and naturally, students seem to lower their voice....

I also put up here, one of the Peace Corp's manuals about teaching large classes.... free from their website. I haven't reviewed it but might offer some help.
Attachments:

Reply to Discussion

RSS

© 2017   Created by ddeubel.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service