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SITE OF THE DAY - HUNDREDS OF THE "BEST" - Teaching Recipes

Started by ddeubel in Websites / links / access to new resources / communities.. Last reply by Nadeem Nawaz Jul 16, 2019. 102 Replies

We are now in our 3rd edition of "Site of the Day"! Hundreds of the best sites for teaching/learning. See #1 and…Continue

Tags: collection, list, web 2.0, resources, websites

ABCs - Alphabet Resources or Ideas?

Started by NEWS NOW in Teaching and Methodology. Last reply by Amelia Meirizka Jun 20, 2019. 73 Replies

I guess the alphabet is our bread and butter.Got any good ideas for teaching it or using it…Continue

Tags: children, abc, kids, phonics, reading

Learning Designs

Started by Elise in Teaching and Methodology Mar 27, 2019. 0 Replies

I was wondering what you all thought of learning designs pertaining to English language teaching? What are the ways in which you design your lessons to achieve better learning in your students?Continue

A NEW way to teach PHRASAL VERBS so that your students understand and remember them

Started by Andromeda Jones in Teaching and Methodology Dec 31, 2018. 0 Replies

Phrasal verbs are a verb + preposition, adverb or particle. Teaching…Continue

Tags: prepositions, teach, verbs, phrasal

About

Stephen Foster (1826-1864) - Oh ! Susanna . A funny song can be a myth...


This post is a part of our project "Spring of the Poets" inside School Beyond the Walls and i think it can be useful for EFL teachers... Enjoy !

I came from Alabama
wid my banjo on my knee,
I'm gwyne to Louisiana,
My true love for to see ;
It rain'd all night the day I left
The weather it was dry,
The sun so hot I froze to death
Susanna don't you cry.

[Chorus]
Oh ! Susanna Oh ! don't you cry for me
I've come from Alabama wid mi banjo on my knee.

[Solo]
I jumped aboard de telegraph,
And trabbelled down de riber,
De Lectric fluid magnified,
And Killed five Hundred Nigger
De bullgine bust, de horse run off,
I realy thought I'd die ;
I shut my eyes to hold my breath,
Susanna, don't you cry.

[Chorus] Oh ! Susana Oh ! don't you cry for me
I've come from Alabama wid mi banjo on my knee.

[Solo]
I had a dream de odder night,
When ebery ting was still ;
I thought I saw Susanna,
A coming down de hill.
The buck-wheat cake was in her mouth,
The tear was in her eye,
Says I, i'm coming from de South,
Susanna, don't you cry.

[Chorus]
Oh ! Susanna Oh ! don't you cry for me
I've come from Alabama wid mi banjo on my knee.

[Solo]
I soon will be in New Orleans,
And den I'll look all round,
And when I find Susanna,
I will fall upon the ground.
And if I do not find her,
Dis darkie'l surely die,
And when I'm dead and buried,
Susanna, don't you cry.

[Chorus]
Oh ! Susanna Oh ! don't you cry for me
I've come from Alabama wid mi banjo on my knee.

Une très vieille partition datant des années 1850 d'où j'ai tiré les paroles de la chanson...
Source: Duke University Libraries > Digital Collections > Historic Am...






Différentes versions chantées de Oh ! Susanna dans le lecteur Deezer ci-dessous. Ma préférée est la version de Taj Mahal qui date du début des années 70, avec une flûte très psychédélique et une interprétation très inspirée... Mais la plus belle et la plus intelligente est sans aucun doute l'expérimentation toute récente de Matt Turner, un violoncelliste génial du Wisconsin, que l'on peut écouter sur son mySpace... Il est aussi très surprenant combien les versions allemandes données en exemple sont très "kitsch" et semble montrer que nos voisins n'ont strictement rien compris ni à la musique, ni aux paroles...

Il est remarquable aussi de noter combien le deuxième couplet, qui doit être restitué dans le contexte de l'époque, est désormais occulté dans les versions chantées, pour des raisons évidentes. Cependant, il est important de signaler que Stephen Foster est non seulement l'inventeur de la musique country américaine, cataloguée faussement comme "blanche", mais aussi qu'il reconnaissait sa dette envers la musique des esclaves noirs de son époque: “Tout ce que je sais de la musique, je le tiens de vous.”

Enfin, certainement, la version la plus émouvante disponible sur YouTube, très Wild West, chantée au banjo par un Américain tel qu'on les aime...:




Découvrez Kidsongs Kids!

Downloads: 283


Supporter
Comment by ddeubel on December 26, 2008 at 11:21am
wow, Vincent. that's a lot of versions.....Deezer really digs deep...

I really think that we can denude music of its power by singing it and changing it and making it our own.... much like how many cultures take language that was depowering and degrading and by using it as their own, they take away the sting and cleanse it..... But yeah, not to neglect the history of any song and it might just be an opportunity to talk about how song is story is a culture at a time and place and is its values....

But I like the song, brings memories back to me...I used to sing this as I worked on the farm and cursed my dad. My fav. is the Wolfmann Dixieland version!
Comment by Vincent Mespoulet on December 26, 2008 at 1:18pm
yes i like this song too, because when i listen to it, i remember all the western movies of my childhood, specially John Ford's movies... it's a big big mistake to think that Stephen Foster was a racist... His period was racist, and i think it's the same problem in 2008. Being "politically correct" in 2008 doesn't stop racism... The best novel to read bout it is The Human Stain by Philip Roth... As i said in french at the end of this post : Il est remarquable aussi de noter combien le deuxième couplet, qui doit être restitué dans le contexte de l'époque, est désormais occulté dans les versions chantées, pour des raisons évidentes. Cependant, il est important de signaler que Stephen Foster est non seulement l'inventeur de la musique country américaine, cataloguée faussement comme "blanche", mais aussi qu'il reconnaissait sa dette envers la musique des esclaves noirs de son époque: “Tout ce que je sais de la musique, je le tiens de vous.” Translation "We have to notice that the second solo is now occulted in current singing versions, for obvious reasons. However, it is important to know that Stephen Foster is not only the founder of american country music, wrongly labelled "White", but also he acknowledged he owed black slaves music a debt of gratitude: "All i know about music, i have it from you"...

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